• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Maria Ravlik

Associate Researcher

Adress: Platz der Göttinger Sieben 3, D-37073 Göttingen/Germany, Office: MZG 1.125

Phone.: +49 551 39-12857

E-mail: mravlik@gwdg.de

CV | Personal Page 

Education and academic positions:

  • 2013 - present - Research Assistant, Institute of Political Science, Georg August University Göttingen
  • 2009-2011 - National Research University Higher School of EconomicsFaculty of Sociology, Master's degree (with honours)
  • 2004-2009 - Saint-Petersburg State University of Aerospace Instrumentation, Faculty of Economics, Marketing specialist (with honours)

Academic interests:  globalization, migration factors, brain drain and quantitative data analysis.

Research projects:

  • A Cross-National Evaluation of the Sources of Anti-Trafficking Enforcement (2012-2013) 
  • Factors of international Migration:  contemporary trends (2011-2012)

 "A Cross-NationalEvaluation of the Sources of Anti-Trafficking Enforcement and MigrantVulnerability to Trafficking" (ongoing)

Despite the rising concern and the study of human trafficking for 20 years, few studies systematicallyanalyze the phenomenon and almost none take a global, cross-national approach. Quantitativeresearch is rare in this field: most studies cover just one or a few countries (Jac-Kucharski 2012;Mahmoud and Trebesch 2009; Clawson et. al. 2006; Cho 2012; Karakus and Mcgarrell 2011;Danailova-Trainor and Belser 2006; Akee 2007). For instance, Tyldum (2010:1) points out that“attempts to describe worldwide trafficking across regions and arenas are less likely to be successful”.Possibly due to the paucity of systematic, global comparison, the existing literature comes to mixedconclusions of over the determinants of human trafficking. For instance, Cho’s (2012: 35-39)examination of all push and pull factors produces contradictory results. This mixed terrain begs for morecross-national, systematic research.Responding to the gaps in the literature, this study offers, firstly, a more rigorous examination of factorsthat explain anti-trafficking enforcement across the globe. I’ll offer a broad theoretical frameworkaccording to which I’ll test most significant factors influencing global anti-trafficking enforcement.Secondly, the paper aims to prove that migration is a larger process happening through the humantrafficking and migrants are the most vulnerable population for being trafficked. This study is going toprove that migrants are vulnerable to trafficking from a cross-national standpoint.Thirdly, the paper aims to explain characteristics of “push” countries, countries with high migrationflows into countries where anti-trafficking policy is underdeveloped and/or poorly enforced. It is aninteresting phenomenon to explore what characteristics of a country pushes migrants to go to thecountry where they are not safe and possibly can be trafficked.

Research Progress:

 

"Factors of international Migration:  contemporary trends" (completed)

Abstract

Maria takes United Nations definition of international immigrant which is any person who changes his or her country of usual residence for at least one year for any purpose. The dependent variable of Maria’s research was share of migrants in 2010 year in all the 179 countries that are represented in the dataset. GDP per capita, Human Development Index difference between sending and receiving countries, Human Security Index difference between sending and receiving countries, Petroleum Exporting Countries, Rule of law, Civil  liberties and Political rights index, Democracy index, Common colonial relationship, HDI difference, Citizenship, Common colonial relationship and Common official languages were taken as independent variables for the model.

According to the final regression model, size of population, HDI difference between sending and receiving countries, Human Security Index difference between sending and receiving countries, Rule of law and Common colonial relationship determinate share of immigrants in the country. Some dummy variables for countries were included in the survey, and Petroleum Exporting Countries were significantly different case when comparing groups of countries concerning migration flows.

Concerning the main finding of the study, it was proven that countries with high HDI attract immigrants by their potential for comfortable adaptation due to well-developed conditions in these countries, high educational standards and quality of education. Also countries with high Rule of Law index can be attractive due to their guarantees for human rights protection. Trust issues are essential in migration processes. That is why personal and social security reasons are important requirements. Countries with colonial linkages have not only common historical background but cultural links as well. It obviously helps for better adaptation in a receiving country. It is also important to mention that highly educated immigrants do not choose the same countries to migrate as low educated people do.

Research Progress:

 

 

 

 

 


 

Have you spotted a typo?
Highlight it, click Ctrl+Enter and send us a message. Thank you for your help!
To be used only for spelling or punctuation mistakes.