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Regular version of the site

Elena Prutskova

  Associate Researcher

E-mail: evprutskova@gmail.com

CV | Personal Page

Education and academic positions:

  • 2010- present- Researcher, St.Tikhon’s Orthodox University, “Sociology of Religion” Project;
  • 2010- Institute of Sociology – Russian Academy of Science. Postgraduate program completed;
  • 2003- Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences. Master of Arts in Sociology (MA degree of the University of Manchester, UK).

Academic interests: religiosity - quantitative measurement problem, segmentation of Church members, comparative research.

Research projects:     

"Religiosity and tolerance of behavior that is disapproved by religions" (completed)

Brief review of the project

The central research question is how religiosity influences attitudes towards behavior that is disapproved by major religions (dealing with sexuality, family and existential questions). Analysis is based on EVS – European Values Study  data, collected in 2008. Special focus of analysis is on new forms of religiosity – believing without belonging and belonging without believing (Davie G., 1990) which have shown to be even more tolerant, than non-religious Europeans. Linear regressions show that the effect of increasing tolerance in the two outlier groups is diminishing when controlled for socio-demographic variables, denomination and country group. To some extent it is mediated by higher education level, living in Scandinavian or Western European countries (with higher proportions of non-traditional religiosity and higher levels of secularization), and belonging to Protestantism. But the effect of increasing tolerance in belonging not believing and believing not belonging groups remains even when controlled for all the variables mentioned. The findings suggest that religiosity does account for some share of influence on people’s norms, values, and attitudes, but only when it is a coherent phenomenon.We find negative relationship between religiosity and tolerance towards behavior, disapproved by religions, but the strength of this relationship differs in different groups of countries. It is highest in Southern Europe and lowest in Post-Soviet countries. It is argued that primary religious socialization plays an important role here (Meulemann H., 2010). Multilevel regression model shows that if an individual lives in a society where the mechanism of primary religious socialization works (relatively high % of people, who attended religious services in childhood regularly), then the negative connection between religiosity and tolerance of behavior, disapproved by major religions, is stronger. 

Research Progress:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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