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Regular version of the site

Cinzia Di Novi

Associate Researcher 


Adress: Venezia, Italy 

E-mail: cinzia.dinovi@unive.it 

CV | Personal Page 

Education and academic positions:

  • 2008 - Ph.D in Economics, Università di Torino, Turin. Ph.D. Supervisor: Prof. Ugo Colombino; Prof. Turati Gilberto. Dissertation title: “On the Determinants of Human Health: An Economic Perspective”

  • 2004 - Master in Economics, CORIPE Piemonte (University of Turin, Turin, Italy).

  • 2003 - Bachelor in Political Sciences, University of Eastern Piedmont, Alessandria, Italy. Final mark110/110 cum laude, print worthy. Dissertation title: “Regolazione dei Prezzi o delle Quantità: ilModello di Weitzman Alcuni Sviluppi”). Supervisor: Prof. Mario Ferrero.

Academic interests:  Public Economics, Applied Economics, Micro-econometrics, Health Economics, Health Econometrics, Population Economics, Economics of Long Term Care.

Research projects:   

The Role of Family and Cultural Differences in Explaining the Relationship between the Provision of Informal Care and the Informal Caregivers Well-Being

Abstract

The advances in medicine over the last half century have increased life expectancy in the Westernworld. Due to this increased life expectancy on the one hand, but also to a particularly accentuateddrop in birth rates, Europe is getting older. The ageing of the population and the greater longevity ofindividuals can be expected to lead to increasing numbers of older persons in need of long-termcare. This need is partly met by professional (or formal) supply of caregiving (e.g. medical doctors,nurses) either in dedicated structures (e.g. hospitals, nursing homes) or at the elder’s home; but it isalso met by relatives and friends (“informal caregivers”) who provide caregiving for the elderly.This project aims to analyse the impact of the provision of care on the well-being of informalcaregivers. I would test whether this relationship differs across European countries and Europeanmacro-regions according to a North–East-South gradient. Indeed, while there is a strong emphasison family throughout the continent, there is substantial evidence of cultural differences betweenNorthern, Eastern and Southern Europe which motivate such a focus.The empirical investigation will be performed using a representative sample drawn from theSHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe) survey, specifically, Waves 1 and 2,4 and 5. This analysis would be relevant from a policy point of view as it aims to provide evidenceon the well-being consequences caused by the burden of care provided and to shed light on thecultural factors which caracterized the different European macro-areas which may influence theimpact of caregiving on the caregivers’ quality of life and health.

 

 


 

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