• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

Kenisha Samantha Russell Jonsson

Kenisha Russel-Jonsson 

Associate Researcher

E-mail: ksruss@essex.ac.uk

 

  CV | Personal page

Education and academic positions:

  • 2013-present - PhВ in Sociological Research, University of Essex;
  • 2009-2011 - Multi-disciplinary Masters in Demography, Stockholm University;
  • 2004-2006 - Masters in International Relations and Globalisation, London Metropolitan University;
  • 2000-2003 - Bachelors of Science in International Relations and Sociology, University of the West Indies;

Academic interests:  The sociology of illness, health inequality/inequity, impact of demographic processes on health, neighbourhood effects, diversity, integration.

Research Projects:

Marital status, work, subjective health & well-being: A cross national comparative study of gender specific working hours and self-assessed health. Research on the effect of marriage on health has largely maintained that there is a distinctly gender-specific gradient in health outcomes, with men deriving far greater health benefits than women. One of the main reasons provided for these differences is the disproportionate time spent by women on household activities. However, this hypothesis has yet to be explicitly tested. The purpose of this research is therefore to explore the proposed gender-specific effects of marriage versus cohabitation on subjective health and well-being, with specific emphasis on the individual time spent on paid and unpaid work. A cross-national comparative analysis of the observed difference in health trajectories was conducted using the Multinational Time Use Study (MTUS).We observe that married people do more paid work whereas cohabiting partners engage in more unpaid work. There are no differences between cohabiting and married people in terms of health and total working hours. Both married and cohabiting men who work above the mean total working hours (6.7 hours per day), report better health than men who work below the mean, and women with similar marital status.


 

Have you spotted a typo?
Highlight it, click Ctrl+Enter and send us a message. Thank you for your help!
To be used only for spelling or punctuation mistakes.