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Regular version of the site

Alexi Gugushvili

LCSR Associate Researcher

Oxford, UK

Education:

  • PhD in the Department of Political and Social Sciences, European University Institute, Florence, Italy: 2009-2014
  • MSc in Policy Studies with Distinction, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom: 2006-2007
  • MA in International Economic Relations, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia: 2003-2005

Academic positions:

Research Fellow in South Caucasus Studies, Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre, Oxford University, UK;
Postdoctoral Researcher at the Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS), University of Bremen, Germany;
Affiliated Fellow at the Center for Social Sciences (CSS), Tbilisi State University, Georgia

Publications:

E-mail: alexi.gugushvili(at)sant.ox.ac.uk

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 CV | Персональная страница

Ongoing projects:

Intergenerational Social Mobility and Support for Democracy

Some recent studies have identified the relationship between intergenerational social mobility and general preferences towards redistribution. The mechanism would be that social mobility brings about the idea that society rewards individual success, making those who experience upward mobility less likely to favour egalitarian social policies. Yet, social science research has somewhat ignored testing if these effects of mobility on (re-)distributive preferences are invariant across specific welfare state programmes. For instance, education and healthcare expenditures might be important to upwardly mobile individuals who view equal access to human capital as instrumental for positive life trajectories, whereas downwardly mobile individuals may prioritise welfare programmes with more immediate implications such as housing, pensions and support for poor. To test this hypothesis, we employ the Life in Transition Survey (LITS) for 2006-2010, which covers all post-socialist societies and five established welfare democracies (FR, DE, IT, SE and UK). Dependent variable derives from the LITS respondents' answers on the first and second priorities for extra government spending on education, pensions, healthcare, housing, and `assisting the poor'. Controlling for conventional of welfare preferences, our main independent variable on social mobility experience stems from the survey question that ask respondents whether they agree or disagree with the following statement: `I have done better in life than my parents.' Categorical answer options of the dependent variable are best understood using multinomial logistic model, while for the analysis of contextual variables we employ multi-level regression technique that consists of level 1 individual analysis, level 2 country contextual characteristics, and their cross-level interactions with respondents' social mobility experience.

Academic interests:
post-socialist transition, public opinion and attitudes, democracy and democratization, nationalism and national identity, quantitative social sciences, social stratification and mobility, comparative welfare research, political sociology, and migration studies.

   

 


 

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